Tag Archives: army west point

Full Army West Point Triple Option Offensive Lineman Interview

https://tripleoptionfootball.com/2014/01/06/triple-option-football-academy-interview-with-former-army-offensive-lineman-zach-peterson-part-one/

https://tripleoptionfootball.com/2017/02/24/triple-option-football-academy-interview-with-former-army-offensive-lineman-zach-peterson-part-two-2/

Advertisements

Proper Double Flex Formation Alignment

Below is the alignment for the Double Flex formation, which is Army and Navy’s modern-day primary formation.

Executing Double Flex, Zone Option versus 6-2 Defense

When running Zone Option out of Double Flex, the Offensive Line, A-Backs, and Backside Receiver have the same responsibilities as Triple Option.

The Playside Receiver blocks down.

The B-Back leads for the Quarterback and blocks the Mike to the Free Safety while the Quarterback takes the snap, goes down the line, turns up and scores unless #2 can tackle him… if so, the Quarterback sets his feet and parallel flicks the ball.

Here’s Zone Option versus the 4-4/6-2 Defense:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are interested in working with Dr. Cella, connect with him at 570.332.0265.

Brent Davis’ Offensive Line Drills from Georgia Southern

Army Offensive Coordinator, Brent Davis was at Georgia Southern prior to his arrival at West Point.

Here are Brent Davis’ Offensive Line drills from his days at Georgia Southern:

Running Zone Option out of Heavy

The Heavy Formation brings the Backside Tackle over to the formation side, and puts the Backside Receiver where the Backside Tackle was.

Zone Option is utilized when the defense forces a give to the B-Back on Triple.

When this happens, the offense makes the defense defend the Quarterback and the Backside A-Back.

The Heavy Tackle blocks down while the Offensive Line and the perimeter does exactly what they do on Triple Option. The B-Back becomes the extra blocker because of the numbers advantage while the Quarterback takes the snap, opens at 90 degrees, turns off the Receiver’s block and scores unless #2 can tackle him–if so, he sets his feet and parallel flicks the ball to the Backside A-Back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Utilize Heavy Zone Option when the defense forces the B-Back give on Triple.  Make the defense play the Quarterback when they don’t want to do so.

Army Threw for 361 Yards All Season… and Had Their Best Season Since 1996

Army West Point had their first 10-win season since 1996.

They threw for 361 yards all season (on 20 completions).

Fun Fact: Army West Point was #4 in the nation for yards/completion.

If anyone tells you that you need to throw the ball to win… show them this.

2017 ARMY WEST POINT PASSING STATISTICS
NAME CMP ATT YDS CMP% YDS/A TD INT RAT
Ahmad Bradshaw 14 43 285 32.6 6.63 1 2 86.6
Kelvin Hopkins Jr. 6 18 76 33.3 4.22 1 1 76.0
Totals 20 65 361 30.8 5.55 2 6 69.1

What Army, Navy, and Georgia Tech’s Leading Rusher in 2017 All Have in Common

The Under-Center, Flexbone Triple Option Offense continues to evolve.

In 2017, Navy’s top two leading rushers were their Quarterbacks, Zach Abey and Malcolm Perry.  Also, 56% of Navy’s run offense were Quarterback runs.

NAVY 2017 RUSHING STATISTICS
NAME CAR YDS AVG LONG TD
Zach Abey 293 1413 4.8 75 (TD) 19
Malcolm Perry 138 1182 8.6 92 (TD) 11
Chris High 144 621 4.3 37 2
Anthony Gargiulo 76 423 5.6 44 3
Josh Brown 22 203 9.2 39 (TD) 2
Darryl Bonner 33 178 5.4 38 1
Joshua Walker 15 106 7.1 48 (TD) 2
Keoni-Kordell Makekau 16 103 6.4 22 0
John Brown III 15 90 6.0 15 0
Garret Lewis 26 83 3.2 16 0
Tre Walker 9 68 7.6 26 1
Jahmaal Daniel 8 49 6.1 13 0
Brandon Colon 3 40 13.3 26 0
Mike Martin 5 19 3.8 7 0
Nelson Smith 8 17 2.1 4 0
Akili Taylor 1 -2 -2.0 0 0
Craig Scott 1 -5 -5.0 0 0
Totals 822 4568 5.6 92 42

In 2017, Army West Point’s leading rusher was their Quarterback, Ahmad Bradshaw.

ARMY WEST POINT 2017 RUSHING STATISTICS
NAME CAR YDS AVG LONG TD
Ahmad Bradshaw 242 1746 7.2 71 (TD) 14
Darnell Woolfolk 157 812 5.2 44 (TD) 14
Kell Walker 86 629 7.3 47 (TD) 6
Andy Davidson 116 627 5.4 42 5
Connor Slomka 49 216 4.4 29 4
Calen Holt 42 214 5.1 30 1
Jordan Asberry 18 115 6.4 22 0
Fred Cooper Jr. 13 72 5.5 17 (TD) 2
John Trainor 18 66 3.7 24 1
Sandon McCoy 12 58 4.8 13 0
Kelvin Hopkins Jr. 7 40 5.7 22 0
Luke Langdon 8 24 3.0 7 1
Kjetil Cline 1 23 23.0 23 0
Zack Boobas 2 23 11.5 12 (TD) 1
Nick Schrage 1 15 15.0 15 0
Artice Hobbs IV 2 15 7.5 18 (TD) 1
TJ Wisham Jr. 2 14 7.0 12 0
Dominic Distefano 1 10 10.0 10 0
Donovan Franklin 1 7 7.0 7 0
Blake Wilson 1 -9 -9.0 0 0
Totals 785 4710 6.0 71 50

In 2017, Georgia Tech’s leading rusher was their Quarterback, TaQuon Marshall.

RUSHING STATISTICS
NAME CAR YDS AVG LONG TD
TaQuon Marshall 247 1146 4.6 78 (TD) 17
KirVonte Benson 204 1053 5.2 65 6
Nathan Cottrell 33 271 8.2 69 0
Qua Searcy 36 217 6.0 42 (TD) 1
Clinton Lynch 28 209 7.5 48 0
Jerry Howard 23 175 7.6 65 (TD) 2
J.J. Green 21 156 7.4 36 2
Quaide Weimerskirch 16 70 4.4 19 (TD) 1
Matthew Jordan 15 56 3.7 12 1
Ricky Jeune 1 30 30.0 30 0
Jay Jones 2 9 4.5 6 0
KeShun Freeman 1 3 3.0 3 0
Lucas Johnson 1 1 1.0 1 0
Pressley Harvin III 1 -13 -13.0 0 0
Totals 632 3381 5.4 78 30
FBS Rushing Offense
Last updated – December 31, 2017 Through games of December 30, 2017
RANK TEAM G RUSH RUSH YDS YDS/RUSH RUSH TD YPG
1 Army West Point 13 785 4710 6.00 50 362.3
2 Navy 13 822 4568 5.56 42 351.4
3 Arizona 13 613 4021 6.56 48 309.3
4 Air Force 12 765 3689 4.82 38 307.4
5 Georgia Tech 11 632 3381 5.35 30 307.4

Quarterbacks runs take the Triple Option Offense to another level in 2017.  Utilize this information to make your Triple Option Offense go.  

Happy 2018!

How the Triple Option Offense is Evolving with Army and Navy as We Move Into 2018

Army and Navy’s top three formations in 2017 (combined):

1- Double Flex

2- Heavy

3- Flex Spread

Army and Navy’s top three concepts in 2017 (combined):

1- Zone Option

2- Zone Dive

3- Triple Option

Happy 2018!

The Two Offensive Formations Army West Point Ran in 2017

In 2017, Army West Point had their best season in 22 seasons, and they were based out of two formations–Double Flex and Heavy.

They were aligned in one of these formations, or a combination thereof, 95% of the time in their bowl win versus San Diego State.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Double Flex compresses the Receivers as they are six feet from the Offensive Tackle with their inside foot up.  The benefit is that this formation puts the cornerbacks in an automatic run support situation, which is often a better perimeter matchup for the offense.  In addition, it eliminates the Playside Receiver and Playside A-Back having to read the Deep Defender and #3.  This is because the Corner is now #3 and the Safety is the Deep Defender.  If the Safety is in the middle of the field, the Receiver will load and block the Mike to the Free Safety.  He has a better angle to load as if the Mike runs over the top, he is two yards wider than the A-Back to wall off the Mike.

The Heavy Formations brings the Backside Tackle to the formation side to create an extra blocker 3.5 feet away from the Formation-side Tackle.  Then, the Backside Receiver replaces the Backside Tackle and aligns 3.5 feet away from the Backside Guard in a 3-point stance.  At times, Army would utilize a sixth Offensive Lineman as the Backside Tackle.  The benefit of utilizing a Receiver is that he is eligible and must be covered in the passing game.  In addition, Army would move their Playside A-Back’s alignment to behind the Heavy Tackle in certain situations.  This is especially true when they ran the Down (Belly-G) as to give the Playside A-Back a better angle to cancel the Mike.

What Army Does Versus Hard B-Gap Pressure

Often times when Army wants to run the Zone Option, the 3-technique can create penetration.

When this happens, they get into the Heavy Formation.

Heavy formation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then, they run the Down (also known as Belly-G).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a gap-scheme concept to control the penetration of the 3-technique when they run off-tackle especially when they don’t get four yards on the give to the B-Back on Triple Option.

Both Tackles block down if there is a threat in their gap.  If not, they would veer inside and block the first linebacker that shows.  The Playside Guard traps the first threat off the Heavy Tackle.  

The B-Back runs through the inside leg of the Heavy Tackle and gets vertical.

This controls the 3-technique when the offense can’t get four yards on the give phase of the Triple Option.